Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Rejection is good for you

One of my number one goals for college is to get rejected.  You may be thinking "what an interesting goal" ... aka "this girl is an idiot" *cough*. But I'm being 100% serious so hear me out. Bear with me through this blog post in which I attempt to order my thoughts into semi-coherent passages.

I have never been socially rejected in my life. Not by girls, boys, crushes, or anyone in between. On a similar note, I've never directly experienced any drama. Some of my friends may have bickered, or experienced some kind of boy trouble, but I have always had a clean (nonexistent) record. I am the "nice one", sometimes dubbed "quiet", "perfect". I used to be proud of my angelic existence; I thought I was above the drama, stupid gossip, and boys. Instead of being an actress in the theater production, I floated above it as a silent observer. It was nice until it wasn't anymore. I realized that being in the play might mean a missed line, incorrect footing, embarrassment (things the observer would never have to deal with), but at the same time, as the observer I had no stories. My life was without a climax, without zest, without gains. It was a monotony of smiling, missed chances, and unspoken sentiments. 

I was never rejected because I was too afraid to try.  And that's not the way I want to live anymore. 

From now on, I will put myself out there enough to be rejected. I am okay with losing a couple of friends if it means finding the ones who will stick with me for a life time. I am content with expressing feelings for my crushes (even if I embarrass myself) because only then will I ultimately attract "the one".

There's nothing wrong with being rejected. It just means you're brave enough to jump, all the while knowing the risks and danger lurking if you fall. We should not be suffocated by our fears but rather invigorated by them. So don't fear rejection like I did and instead embrace it with arms wide open, saying "Come at me with all you got. I don't let my fears control me". 

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

Is Prom Overrated?

It's the morning after prom. I went to sleep at around 4 am but due to some internal clock in my body that I can't turn off, woke up at 8 am. I feel awake and alert...as of right now, and in the mood for a casual blog write up. So here it goes. If my sentences become incoherent, let's blame it on the 4 hrs of sleep ;)

In honor of my "after-prom" morning, I will dedicate this blog post to...dun dun dun...drum roll...PROM (what a surprise). To many people, prom is like a right of passage for high school students and thanks to lovely, very accurate movies it is depicted as a perfect night to remember. Girls (maybe guys too but I can't speak for the opposite gender) conjure up various romantic fantasies: walking under moonlit arches decorated by green vines, slow dancing with that special someone, and then kissing him under the stars. Are such imaginations reality? From my experience, no. As a declaimer though, I should note that I have always been an anti-prom gal. Since junior year, I have been cynical about the whole event, believing it to be too much hassle and money for just one stinking dance at night. I would rather have a guy that I liked ask me out to the movies. The notion and setting is simple, yet it is easy to build into the atmosphere more romance if you're with someone you have feelings for.

My past negative feelings for prom still linger, and I am still waiting for that movie date (^.^). However, after actually experiencing this ultimate high school dance, I believe it is possible to enjoy prom. Here are a couple of tips for you guys on making the most out of it.

1) First, do not expect it to be a magical night. Erase those unrealistic fantasies from your daydreams sweetie, because chances are you will be disappointed. I went to prom with a friend who I had no romantic feelings for whatsover, so my perspective is not from that of an existing couple or "guy-girl best friends" turn lovers. If you are, maybe your experience will feel more magical simply due to those butterflies in your stomach. But even then, do not expect to much out of that one night. The structure of prom is just too rigid and entirely unromantic. See, a typical prom schedule is dinner, prom, after party. If you're having dinner at a fancy place, which most people do, then you'll be waiting for that food for what feels like hours. During that time span, it's usually small talk with friends and friends-of-friends. Then, prom itself will have food and you'll regret not eating less, and there will be random music booming in an unlit room filled with round tables. And though I can't speak for after parties because my group went to a get pancakes instead, it usually consists of alcohol and crazy partying until the sunrises.
So just remember: prom is a social event, not a sweet romantic date.

2) I also recommend keeping dinner casual and light. Like I mentioned previously, fancy dinner reservations take too long and prom will usually have food as well. The more casual atmosphere gives you freedom to socialize and talk to everyone in the group and loosen up before the dance itself.

3) Actually dance at prom. If you're not a regular to dances, you may initially feel awkward and stiff. Regardless, step outside of your comfort zone, sway to the beat, and just let loose.

So there's my little rant about my prom experience. If you have any stories or thoughts you have regarding prom, leave them in the comments!